Diagnosis

2019-01-18


Diagnostic methods

 

Outline

1. The diagnostics of traditional Chinese medicine is to understand the inside by carefully studying the outside, from the first small beginnings to see how things will develop, and to recognize the pathological change with the physiological condition.

2. Inspection, Auscultation and olfaction, Inquiring, Palpation.

3. Tongue diagnosis, Pulse diagnosis.

 

Texts and notes

1. Overview

1.1. Diagnostic methods and diagnostics of traditional Chinese medicine

(1). To understand the inside by carefully studying the outside

(2). From the first small beginnings to see how things will develop

(3). To recognize the pathological change with the physiological condition

1.2. Classification of diagnostic methods

2. Inspection

2.1. Observation of the vitality

(1). Vigorous with vitality

(2). Spiritless with less vitality

(3). Exhausted with false vitality

(4). Disordered in mental activities

2.2. Observation of the colour

(1). Normal colour and diseased colour

(2). Secretion and excretion

(3). Precautions

2.3. Observation of the appearance

(1). Body shape

(2). Movement and posture

2.4. Observation of the head and face

(1). Head

(2). Face (except the complexion and vitality)

2.5. Observation of the five sense organs

(1). Eye

(2). Ear

(3). Nose

(4). Mouth and lips

(5). Throat

2.6. Secretion and excretion

(1). Phlegm

(2). Nasal discharge

(3). Stools

(4). Urine 

3. Tongue diagnosis

3.1. Tongue proper

(1). Colour

(2). Form

(3). Motion  

3.2. Tongue coating

(1). Quality

(2). Colour

3.3. Method of and precautions in tongue diagnosis

3.4. Key points in analyzing the tongue and significance of tongue diagnosis                                                                    

4. Auscultation (listening) and olfaction (smelling)

4.1. Listening 

(1). Listening to the sound  

(2). Listening to the speech  

(3). Listening to the respiration  

(4). Listening to the cough  

(5). Listening to the vomiting  

(6). Listening to the hiccup  

(7). Listening to the belching  

4.2. Smelling 

(1). Smell from the mouth   

(2). Smell of the sputum and nasal discharge   

(3). Smell of the urine and stool   

(4). Smell of the menstruation, leukorrhea, and lochia   

(5). Smell of the vomitus   

5. Inquiring

5.1. Chills and fever

(1). Chills accompanied by fever

(2). Chills without fever

(3). Fever without chills

(4). Tidal fever

(5). Alternate chills and fever

5.2. Perspiration

(1). Presence of sweating

(2). Absence of sweating

(3). Special sweating

(4). Local sweating

5.3. Pain

(1). Nature of the pain

(2). Location of the pain

5.4. Ear and eye

(1). Ear

(2). Eye

5.5. Head, body, chest, and abdomen

(1). Dizziness

(2). Fullness in chest

(3). Numbness

5.6. Sleep

(1). Insomnia

(2). Somnolence

5.7. Appetite, thirst, and taste

(1). Thirst

(2). Appetite

(3). Taste

5.8. Defecation and urination

(1). Defecation

(2). Urination

5.9. Menses and leukorrhea

(1). Menses in abnormal cycles

(2). Menses in abnormal quantity

(3). Leukorrhea

6. Pulse diagnosis

6.1. Method of pulse diagnosis

(1). Location for feeling the pulse

(2). Patient’s position for feeling the pulse

(3). Feeling the pulse

6.2. Normal pulse and diseased pulses

(1). Normal pulse

(2). Abnormal pulse

①. Superficial pulse (fu mai)

②. Deep pulse (chen mai)

    ③. Slow pulse (chi mai)

    ④. Rapid pulse (shu mai)

⑤. Pulse of deficiency type (xu mai)

⑥. Pulse of excess type (shi mai)

. Surging pulse (hong mai)

. Thready pulse (xi mai)

. Rolling pulse (hua mai)

. Hesitant pulse (se mai)

. String-taut pulse (xuan mai)

   . Tense pulse (jin mai)

. Soft pulse (ru mai)

    . Knotted pulse (jie mai)

. Abrupt pulse (cu mai)

. Regularly intermittent pulse (dai mai)

 

Essentials

Original and explanation


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